MSc/PhD Program
Jasmin Roya Djannatian
First Name:
Jasmin Roya

Last Name:
Djannatian

Country:
Germany

 



Jasmin Roya Djannatian

EDUCATION

College / University:
since 2000: Georg August University Göttingen, Faculty of Medicine

Highest Degree:
1. Staatsexamen in Medicine

Major Subjects:
Molecular Biology, Medicine, Cancer

Lab Experience:
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, RNA work, PCR, cell culture, flow cytometry

Projects / Research:
1999 - 2000: 'composition and cytotoxicity of different mistletoe preparations on leukemic cells' at the German Center for Biotechnological research in Brunswick
since 2001: 'the role of the voltage-gated K+ -channel ether-a-gogo in leukemias' at the Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, department Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Prof. Stühmer, Göttingen

Scholarships:
2000 - 2002: Stiftung Stipendien-Fonds des Verbandes der chemischen Industrie
2003 - 2004: Stipend International Max Planck Research School

Awards:
1999: Second prize in the federal state of Lower Saxony in the 'Jugend forscht' competition: 'RNA-Isolation and RNA-concentration of Saccharomyces cerevisae during the development':
2000: Second prize in the federal 'Jugend forscht' competition: 'Cytotoxicity of different mistletoe preparations on leukemic cells':
2000: Second prize at the '12th European Union Contest for Young Scientists' , in Amsterdam
2000: Participation at the ‘Stockholm International Youth Science Seminar’, including the participation at the Nobel prize ceremony

Publications:
'Wirken Mistelpräparate gegen Leukämiezellen?' , Junge Wissenschaft, 62, 17-22, Mai 2001


SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS AND GOALS:

My main interest focuses on the development, behaviour and therapeutical treatment of cancerous diseases. In detail I am interested in the role of ionic channels and channelopathies in the development of cancer. I would like to understand the functions of the nervous system on a molecular level and how neuronal disorders develop. I hope to be able to contribute to the development of advanced therapies in the future.